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Barbara L. Jouette, Attorney, P.C.
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Posts tagged "dispute"

Using alternative dispute resolution in a divorce

Texas residents who are seeking a divorce may be interested in some alternatives to litigation for resolving their disputes. While the court usually has the final word, the parties may be able to take their situation in their own hands to get a more fair outcome.

Money mistakes to avoid during a Texas divorce

Although a divorce may be an emotional time in an individual's life, nothing should be overlooked from a financial standpoint. Making mistakes such as underestimating cash flow needs or the impact of joint liabilities can stunt a person's efforts to live a financially secure life after the marriage has ended. It is also important to look over prior tax returns to determine if any tax assets need to be considered in a divorce settlement.

The benefits of prenuptial agreements

When two people decide to get married in Texas, they may not be considering a prenuptial agreement. However, according to a recent article, the documents are apparently gaining in popularity, suggesting that many individuals wish to protect their rights and their separate property.

Texans benefit from careful asset protection in a divorce

A recent divorce dispute involved a husband who wanted half of an inheritance his wife had received from her grandfather's estate two years before. This type of situation is not uncommon in a divorce, and different circumstances may apply from one divorce case to another. An important distinction is legally made between separate property, which is not divided, and marital property, which is divided.

Texas man allegedly thought his legal separation was a divorce

When two people come to the end of a marriage, they must participate in important legal processes that validate the termination of their marriage. If an individual fails to comprehend the implications and underlying principles associated with divorce, as well as its distinction from legal separation, they may later face negative legal repercussions.

Father faces family law issue, seeks custody of daughter

In Texas, when either married or unmarried couples choose to separate, the fate of any children that resulted from these relationships may be determined by court. Parents often disagree about significant family law matters that will affect their children, such as custody or adoption arrangements.

Study addresses prominence of divorce in relation to U.S. economy

Issues related to money matters, including financial dishonesty and conflicting spending practices, are some of the most widely noted reasons why couples in Texas choose to end their marriages. Recent findings indicate that America’s improving economy is causing an increase in the national divorce rate.

Family law discrepancies claimed in $130M adoption lawsuit

When two parents decide to separate from one another, they are often faced with difficult decisions regarding the future care of their children. It is not uncommon for individuals to dispute important matters like custody, parental rights, adoption wishes or other similar factors. The final living arrangements are sometimes determined by state laws, which can vary — as with Texas and Utah, for example — and can sometimes lead to family law issues.

Sweetin, Coyle dispute custody and alimony in divorce filings

When couples in Collin County decide their marriage is no longer working, they often choose to divorce. In the majority of cases, there are issues that need to be sorted out in order to reach a settlement. Couples may disagree on things, including child custody, spousal support and property division, and require the assistance of a family law court to reach an agreement.

Supreme Court rules on Indian Child Welfare Act case

In 1978, the federal government established the Indian Child Welfare Act. The law was meant to protect the parental rights of Native American parents in Collin County, and throughout the U.S., whose children had been forcibly removed from their care. Prior to this family law being put into effect, a study showed that at least a quarter of all Native American children were being placed in foster care or put up for adoption for no reason other than ignorant child welfare laws.